Friday
Mar182011

Chair: Dr. John Vella

Room H302
(213)381-5121 ext.3073

Faculty List

Departmental Requirements:  Eight semesters required

  1. Common required courses for freshmen, sophomores, and juniors.
  2. Elective courses for seniors.

 

Friday
Jan282011

Department Overview

English Department Philosophy

The goals of the English Department at Loyola High School focus on guiding the student to confront his personal challenges and those of the world at large. The student should be rooted in the canon of traditional literature, yet versatile in his ability to confront modern imaginative and philosophical thought. To become a critical and visionary thinker, he will experience a variety of literary selections and diverse methodology from his teachers, who themselves aim to embody the ideals of resourceful life-long learners and communicators.

In keeping with the Ignatian vision, Christian values are the center point of a humanistic English curriculum. By making value judgments based on an understanding of man as he is, in terms of man as he has been and ought to be, the student himself will grow as a Christian man of thought and action. Reflecting rationally about the values of his own life, he can discern those values in the variety of cultures in the world around him as they relate to the good or harm of his fellow persons. Thus, his academic achievement will have a lasting impact on the practical aspects of his life: spiritual, emotional, intellectual, moral, and social.


Departmental Graduation Requirements


As stated in Loyola's Faculty Handbook and in its Parents'/Student Handbook, each Loyola student is required to complete eight consecutive semesters of English. Freshmen, sophomores, and juniors are enrolled in year-long English courses covering specific literature, grammar and composition, research, vocabulary, and speaking skills. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors who meet critical reading and writing requirements are encouraged to enroll in Honors or Advanced Placement after their freshman year. Seniors enroll in one-semester electives unless they meet requirements for A.P. or for College Reading and Writing.


Tuesday
Nov092010

English 1

(2 Semesters)

The freshman year English course establishes the foundation for the study of composition and literature. Beginning with How to Get Good Grades, freshmen are both tested on and expected to establish these habits for success not only in English but in their other classes. The study of composition begins with a focus on grammar (parts of speech, parts of sentence, phrases, and clauses) as well as punctuation and agreement rules. Students will practice writing in various sentence patterns; they will also write letters, paragraphs and multi-paragraph essays, practicing narrative, descriptive, expository, and argumentative modes of discourse. The study of vocabulary takes an etymological approach so that students learn to build meaning rather than memorize definitions. Literature samples each of these genres: short story, essay, poetry, drama, and novel. A three-day library overview immerses students in the basics of navigating all resources available through Burns' Library.

Mrs. ArneyMr. Caldwell, Mrs. LynchMr. Robles, Mr. PentecostDr. Vella

Tuesday
Nov092010

English 2

(2 semesters)

English 2 builds upon the writing skills of freshman year with the construction process of the well-wrought theme (3-5 paragraphs) as the major goal. Included are elements of unity, coherence, and emphasis; inductive and deductive reading; and four types of themes: exposition, narration, description, and argumentation. Vocabulary building continues with the study of roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Students also learn and apply to their own writing the Modern Language Association (MLA) requirements for documentation. Formal grammar instruction continues from ninth grade. American literature from the Colonial Period to the present is surveyed in chronological and/or thematic units.

Mr. Brown, Ms. GacinaMs. Moore

Tuesday
Nov092010

Honors English 2

(2 Semesters)

Honors English 2 is designed for students who have done exceptionally well in their English 1 class throughout the year. American literature from Colonial times to the present will be surveyed. This survey explores poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction of each literary period. Students write various essays (using various development techniques learned throughout the year) exploring the basic questions and issues of many canonical American writers. Study skills, library research skills and techniques, and creative writing will be further developed and reinforced throughout the year. Vocabulary, advanced sentence structure problems, and special grammatical problems in writing will be explored. Prerequisite: A 3.0 overall GPA and a 3.0 or higher in English 1, passing score on the entrance test, recommendation of the student's English 1 teacher, and approval of the department chair. This course must be taken for two semesters.

Mr. Caldwell, Mrs. Arney

Tuesday
Nov092010

English 3

(2 semesters)

With an early focus on preparation for the PSAT, students continue their study and application of grammar (specifically verb usage, parallel structure, effective coordination/subordination of ideas), and effective essay writing. Writing assignments demonstrate literary analysis as well as synthesis of multiple sources according to correct MLA documentation. Students practice not only strategies for timed writings but also steps to the writing process. Vocabulary study continues with a text different from that used in English 1 and English 2. A survey of British literature includes the earliest English epic Beowulf readings from Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, Shakespeare's Macbeth, as well as samplings from the works of Donne, Milton, Blake, Eliot, Yeats, and others at the teacher's discretion.

Ms. GacinaMrs. Jardine, Mr. Marsh, Ms. Moore

Tuesday
Nov092010

AP English Language 3

(2 semesters)

Approved by the College Board, Advanced Placement English Language 3 is a rigorous British literature and rhetoric course requiring students to read closely and analyze carefully a variety of fiction (prose and poetry) and nonfiction. With an overall thematic focus on the human condition, this study of primarily British literature includes the epic, novel, drama, and poetry; nonfiction readings, not limited to British authors, include essays, sermons, speeches, and letters. Through close reading and analytical writing, students will improve skills in identifying and explaining the effects of literary conventions and rhetorical strategies. Written assignments include the formal research paper, a formal essay per unit, and essay exams; in-class essays require writers to analyze and synthesize. Finally, through a wide choice of reading material and writing exercises, students will prepare for and take the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Exam administered on the national test day in May. Prerequisites: Honors English 2 students in good standing (C or higher) are automatically enrolled in A.P. English 3. Students enrolled in English 2 must meet the following criteria: a 3.0 overall GPA and a 3.3 or higher in English, passing score on the entrance test, recommendation from the student's English 2 teacher, and approval of the department chair. This course must be taken for two semesters.

Mr. Marsh, Mr. Schmidt

Tuesday
Nov092010

AP English Literature 4

(2 semesters)

Approved by the College Board, this restricted course is designed for seniors interested in reading, discussing, and writing about some of the most famous and important works and authors in literature. Because this course also fulfills requirements for a freshman college composition course, essays are regularly scheduled. Students will prepare for and take the Advanced Placement English Literature Exam administered on the national test day in May. Prerequisite: A.P. English 3 students in good standing (C or higher) are automatically enrolled in A.P. English 4. Students enrolled in English 3 must meet the following criteria: a 3.0 overall GPA and a 3.3 or higher in English, passing score on the entrance test, recommendation of the student's English 3 teacher, and approval of the department chair. This course must be taken for two semesters.

Mr. RoblesDr. Vella

Tuesday
Nov092010

AP English Language 4

Approved by the College Board, Advanced Placement English Language 4 is a rigorous rhetoric and composition course that focuses primarily on works of nonfiction. Focusing on non-fiction, students will explore the fundamentals of rhetoric and recognize how stylistic choices in composition contribute to compelling argumentation.  Students will gain an appreciation for the figurative and rhetorical strategies present in non-fiction selections while simultaneously polishing their own craft as skilled rhetoricians; to this end, students will regularly write essays that analyze and synthesize non-fiction selections.  Additionally, students will prepare for the AP Language and Composition exam in May. Prerequisites: only students who have taken English 3 are eligible for this course; students who have taken AP English Language 3 are NOT eligible for this class. Students enrolled in English 3 must meet the following criteria: a 3.0 overall GPA and a 3.3 or higher in English, a recommendation from the student's English 3 teacher, and approval of the department chair. This course must be taken for two semesters.

Mr. Schmidt

Tuesday
Nov092010

Modern American Novel

(1 semester)

This course studies the development of the modern American novel from the post-World War I era to the contemporary scene. Six novels are examined: Reading assignments average 150 pages per week with twice weekly "pop" quizzes on the readings. An essay is required approximately every 2-3 weeks; these assignments include in-class writing, papers prepared outside of class (5 pages in length), and summaries of individual oral reports. Midterm and final examinations are in essay format.

Mr. Pentecost

Tuesday
Nov092010

Short Fiction

(1 semester)

The course is designed to acquaint students with a variety of short stories. Adopting the viewpoint of the author and using the terminology of fiction, the student becomes familiar with various themes used in the contemporary short story, as well as the ways in which the literary movements have affected its development. Major activities of the course focus on the reading of a wide range of authors, writing in-depth interpretations of short stories, and the creation of the student's own original short story.

Mrs. Jardine, Mrs. Lynch

Tuesday
Nov092010

World Literature

(1 semester)

This course surveys some of the masterpieces of world literature from the Old Testament and Homer to the present. It introduces students to the literature and ideas which have been important in the development of various cultural traditions, through reading, analysis, and writing about some of that literature.

Mrs. Lynch

Tuesday
Nov092010

Rhetoric and Composition

(1 semester)

Rhetoric and Composition provides seniors with practical speaking and writing experiences with the large part of the work done in class along with peer evaluation. Work includes practice in the personal college essay, the SAT II Writing Test, and the Subject A Exam. Writing across the curriculum focuses on literature, technology, psychology, law, and film. Assignments also include a variety of short oral presentations, journal entries, the summary, argumentative pieces, critiques, a review of the research process and various documentation styles, as well as several creative pieces.

Mrs. Lynch

Tuesday
Nov092010

College Reading and Writing -- not offered 2017-18

(2 semesters)

This restricted course is an intensive reading and writing workshop designed to prepare students for the rigorous demands of day-to-day college literature courses by focusing on the rhetorical modes and the analytical writing process, as well as close reading of college-level textual materials. Enrollment is determined by the English Department Chair and the instructor who select students based on their three-year performance in English and input from English 3 teachers.

 

Tuesday
Nov092010

Shakespeare

(1 semester)

This elective course is designed as an elementary introduction to the life, times, and works of William Shakespeare. It includes research for and lectures on the philosophical, social, and political climate of the English Renaissance—the exciting and creative Elizabethans. Students must participate in discussions of themes, characters, plots, subplots, dramatic architecture, imagery, mood, and critical passages. Students' contributions must be based on their own intelligent and careful analysis of the plays and sonnets. Readings come from Shakespeare's tragedies, comedies, and sonnets. Apart from Hamlet, all other plays are based on the teacher's discretion, sometimes dependent on performances available at area theatres. The overriding and extravagant aim of this course is to create life-long love for the Bard of Avon.

Ms. Jardine

Sunday
Nov072010

Poetry

(1 semester)

This course examines the literary impact the Harlem Renaissance had on the American Literary tableau. Using the poetic terminology of "New Criticism" and a variety of non-fiction articles written by the major personalities from the Harlem Renaissance and beyond, students will learn to uncover the technical skills of the writers and writing through image, action, and risk. To this end, students will read numerous selections from the philosophies the Harlem Renaissance advocated in an effort to pin point what has been instilled in the African American tradition since. Through expository essays and presentations, as well as creative expressions, the class will compare these works to two African American literary movements: the Black Arts Movement and The Dark Room Collective. One memoir and six full poetry collections will be used to help provide a variety of examples from each movement, but will also serve as a source of literary prowess that gave raise to all American literature. These works stand as exemplars of American culture, but move beyond ethnicity, era, and even gender.

Mr. Brown

Sunday
Nov072010

English Teacher Aides

(1 semester)

This course is designed to give seniors, interested and talented in English, an opportunity to aid teachers of freshmen, sophomores, and juniors in their English classes. Activities include leading group discussions, tutoring, and assisting the teacher in correcting work. Prerequisites: Students must have a 3.0 GPA overall, a 3.0 GPA in English, a willingness to accept the responsibility of reading assigned literature, preparing small-group discussions, helping to correct work, planning course materials, and working in the classroom every day. Permission of the instructor and department chair is required.

Dr. Vella

 

Saturday
Nov062010

Directed Study

(1 semester)

This course is designed for serious and competent students who are interested in pursuing learning on their own. A student who applies for this course must detail in writing the nature of their study; this proposal must include the topic for study, objectives, procedure, readings and assignments, and method(s) of evaluation for the course work. Each proposal will be read by all members of the English Department who will decide whether a candidate has sufficiently outlined a workable program. Proposals must be approved by the English Department by the end of April for the next fall semester and by the end of November for the next spring semester. Each student must then sign a Directed Study contract Agreement assuming full responsibility for the completion of the project and his activity during the program. Because of the great demands made by this program, each teacher is restricted to one Directed Study student per semester.