Friday
Mar182011

Chairperson:   Mr. James Zucker

Faculty List »

Departmental Requirements:  Students must complete at least one Social Sciences course during six semesters at Loyola High School beginning in their sophomore year. Sophomores must take a full year World History or AP World History course.  Juniors must take the full year course in United States history. Seniors must take two electives (one each semester) or a year-long offering from among the various Social Science electives.

Friday
Dec172010

World History

(2 semesters)

Students will study the fundamental cultures and events that have been particularly significant in the development of major civilizations from the first millennium on. The first semester will emphasize European Feudalism, the development of Islamic Empires, the dynastic traditions of China, Imperial Japan, and Native American societies. In the second semester, students concentrate on a thematic study of global history, highlighting the process of developing global economic systems, imperialism, industrialization, revolutions in politics, modern warfare, and 20th century society.

Mr. Knoll

Friday
Dec172010

AP World History

(2 semesters)

AP World History is an advanced level course for sophomores. The class will cover various themes in history dating from antiquity to current global realities of the 21st century. The course emphasizes the political, economic, social, cultural, geographical, and technological principles that have contributed to the development of human civilizations around the world. Apart from knowing the basic chronology of events, students should form a strong relationship with the underlying themes of World History as well as an ability to analyze historical documents (both primary and secondary) and communicate a sophisticated knowledge in both written and oral expression. College Credit may be available to students who score 3 or better on the AP exam in May.

Mr. KnollMr. Quedenfeld, Mr. StewartMr. Zucker

Friday
Dec172010

United States History

(2 semesters)

United States history is a one-year course designed to introduce the student to the fundamental themes of American civilization from pre-Columbian times through today. major topics include pre- Columbian North American Cultures, Colonization, the American Revolution, the framing of the Constitution, the Early National Period, Westward Expansion, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Industrialization, Imperialism, Progressivism, World War I, the Roaring Twenties, the Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the 1960's and 1970's.

Dr. Diaz, Mr. Line

Friday
Dec172010

AP US History

(2 semesters)

This accelerated two- semester class for Juniors explores the same themes, problems, and issues that are examined in the college prep survey course in American history. This course, however, will go into greater depth, place a stronger emphasis on primary source documents and expert historians’ writings. No formal textbook will be included. Students will make extensive use of American history websites. The homework load will be more challenging and the regular writing assignments will emphasize persuasive argument.

Mr. Goepel,  Mr. Perkins, Mr. Zucker

Friday
Dec172010

AP US Government

(2 semesters)

This course begins with a review of the basic types of principles of governments through history. It examines the needs, purposes and functions of various governments and political philosophies. The course will focus mainly upon an analysis of the fundamentals of American government: a review of the three branches of the federal government, analysis of federalism, and an analysis of the changing relationship of the federal government and the states in recent American history.

Mr. Stewart

Friday
Dec172010

AP European History

(2 semesters)

Advanced Placement European History is a college level course offered to students in their senior year. The goal of the course is for students to understand and explain the key events in European history from 1450 to the present. Apart from knowing the basic chronology of events, students should form a strong relationship with the underlying themes of Modern European History as well as an ability to analyze historical documents (both primary and secondary) and communicate a sophisticated knowledge of this history in both written and oral expression. College Credit may be available to students who score 3 or better on the AP exam in May.

Mr. Knoll

Friday
Dec172010

AP Art History

(2 semesters)

This accelerated course is designed for Seniors interested in studying Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, and Photography. The two-semester course will encompass works from the cave art of pre-history through the contemporary art scene. Although major emphasis will be given to the Western tradition, the class will also focus on Art beyond the Western tradition (Africa, Asia, Latin America). There is no textbook. Power points and websites will instead be extensively used.

Mr. Goepel

Friday
Dec172010

AP Psychology

(2 semesters)

This course is designed to introduce the students to the systemic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

Mr. Porterfield

Friday
Dec172010

AP Human Geography

(2 semesters)

AP Human Geography is a yearlong course open to Loyola seniors.  This class focuses on how the world’s populations interact with, utilize, and impact the earth’s resources, physical space, and diverse peoples.  Topics include population growth, economic development, urbanization, resource allocation, land use, and geopolitics, and will build upon the related content learned in the freshman Human Geography course.  Students also become well-versed in the vocabulary, methods, and tools geographers use in their science and practice.  This senior course is an optional college-level course for students looking to challenge themselves in the senior year.  In preparation for future courses at the college level, students are expected to develop an in depth understanding of the globe and its regions, an ability to interpret and apply maps and other spatial data, and critical thinking skills related to the economic, political, and cultural phenomena around the world. This course also strongly emphasizes college-level critical thinking skills focusing on independent analysis and writing. Much of the coursework will be centered on applying content knowledge and skills through a variety of independent and small group application activities and real-life scenarios.

Mr. Perkins

Friday
Dec172010

General Psychology

(1 semester)

This is an introductory course in psychology designed to acquaint the student to the definition, history and goals of this rapidly evolving field. The class presents an understandable, yet thorough and accurate, picture of the major findings, methods and applications of psychology. Topics covered include; learning theory, memory formation, hemispheric separateness, perception, motivation, emotions, altered states of consciousness, developmental theory, stress, personality theory and abnormal behavior, as well as the work of major psychologists. Psychology is shown as a rigorous and comprehensive science whose fundamental aspects apply to the individual and society.

Mr. Porterfield

Friday
Dec172010

Economics

(1 semester)

This course introduces the students to the study of various economic philosophies and systems. Attention is devoted to the study of goods and services, the consumer, labor, public finance and the role of government, money credit and banking, and the United States and the world economy.

Mr. Adams

Friday
Dec172010

AP Economics

(2 semesters)

This course will prepare student for both the AP Microeconomics and the AP Macroeconomics exams. The purpose of these courses as published by the College Board is: The purpose of the AP course in Microeconomics is to give the students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equality in the economy.

The purpose of the AP course in Macroeconomics is to give the students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places a particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, and also develops student’s familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics.

Mr. Held

Friday
Dec172010

African-American Studies

(1 semester)

This course will trace the African’s story from 3200 B.C. in their homeland, through present day America. Major emphasis will be given to slavery, the transition from slavery, and the assimilation of African Americans in modern day America. Students will be expected to fashion their own understanding and interpretation of African Americans from a variety of sources of information.

Mr. Adams

Thursday
Dec162010

History of Los Angeles

(1 semester)

This course is a multidisciplinary, critical analysis of Los Angeles with a foundation in the history, culture, ethnicity, political environment, literature, art, architecture and film of and about Los Angeles.  Special emphasis is given to the expanding role of Los Angeles as a global city that serves as a destination for diverse immigrant populations and a center of international commerce.

Dr. Diaz

Thursday
Dec162010

History of World War II

(1 semester)

The History of World War II is a one semester senior elective that covers 1918 to the present, with an emphasis on 1939-1945. The course begins with the rise to power of the Italian Fascists, German Nazis and Japanese imperialists.  Topics include the role of new military technology, social effects on civilians, impact of the war on the post-war Europe and Asia, and the development of the Cold War.  Students examine primary documents from the era and focus on military strategies for the European and Pacific theaters including specific tactics and outcomes of battles.  They also address domestic issues and the Jewish Holocaust.  

Mr. Line

Thursday
Dec162010

Social Studies Teacher Aides

(1 semester)

This course is designed to give seniors, interested and talented in Social Studies, an opportunity to aid freshmen, sophomore, and junior Social Studies teachers in their classes. Activities include leading group discussions, tutoring students, and assisting the teacher in correcting exams. Prerequisite: Students must have a 3.0 GPA in Social Studies, a willingness to accept the responsibility of reading assigned literature, preparing small group discussions, helping to correct homework and exams, planning course materials, and working in the classroom every day. Permission of the instructor and department chairperson is required.

Mr. Zucker

Thursday
Dec162010

Directed Study

(1 semester)

This course is designed for serious and competent students who are interested in pursuing learning on their own. Students who apply for this course must detail in writing the nature of their study, which includes the topic, the objectives, the procedures, the readings and the assignments, and the method of evaluation for the course work. A selection of students will be made by the Social Studies Department (in April for the fall semester; in November for the spring semester), and the students will sign a Directed Study Contract Agreement assuming full responsibility for the completion of their projects and their activity during the program. Because of the great demands made by this program, each teacher will be allowed only one Directed Study student per semester. Prerequisite: permission and approval of the department chairperson and the Directed Studies instructor.