COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAM

“Love is shown more in deeds than in words.” – St. Ignatius Loyola

Overview

Cubs in the Community: Christ-Inspired, Compassionate, Competent and Committed! The Community Service program is an essential part of the Loyola High School educational experience. Rooted in the 450-year-old Ignatian Catholic tradition of being men for and with others, service with marginalized and disenfranchised persons of society is an essential part of a rich and integrated educational tradition that includes academics, activities, the arts and spirituality.

Mission

To form dynamic, transformative, young men through service experiences that help foster compassion and a spirit of generosity to view the world with open hearts and minds—challenging them to become “Men for and with Others.”

Service Program

An integral component of the Loyola High School educational experience, the service and justice programs invite students to experience “what it means to labor with and for others in building a more just world” (Domain 5, p. 25). [i] During each of their four years at Loyola, students will engage in “an articulated sequence of service and reflection opportunities that lead them to experience a s sense of solidarity with the poor and marginalized” (Domain 5, p. 25). [ii]

Director of Community Service: Dr. Jesse Rodriguez

Program Coordinator/HSPT-8 Planner: Mrs. Angela Moran

Community Service Reflector: Rev. Jerry Hudson

Intercambio Immersion Coordinator: Ms. Ana de Castro

Urban Plunge Coordinator: Mr. John Ahearn

Special Projects Coordinator/Volunteer: Mr. Jim Rutkowski

Administrative Assistant: Mrs. Pat Salvaty

What is the goal of the Community Service Program?
To provide opportunities for “metanoia”—a radical transformation of the hearts and minds of our young men; and to provide an articulated sequence of service and reflection opportunities that lead them to experience a sense of solidarity with the poor and marginalized so that such opportunities for transformation can take place.

What “counts” as service?
The service program is central to the goals of a Jesuit Education. Therefore, students are called on a mission to put Two Feet of Love in Action! This foundational tool describes two distinct, but complementary, ways we can put the Gospel in action in response to God’s love: social justice (addressing systemic, root causes of problems that affect many people) and charitable works (short-term, emergency assistance for individuals). For this reason, we believe that service must involve direct assistance to those programs and/or people that are in need. In some way, service must be addressing a root cause of problems that affect the most vulnerable.

How many hours do students need to complete?
Freshmen—10 Hours: All Freshmen must participate in the fall HSPT-8 Tutoring Outreach Program, by volunteering to tutor at two of the six HSPT-8 Sessions.

Sophomores—Those participating in any of the Service and Justice Clusters will fulfill their entire service hour requirement for a given school year as per our program guidelines (students may refer to the Sophomore Service and Justice Clusters on Canvas).

Juniors—25 Hours: Students may serve their hours at any location of their choosing selecting from any one of our 100 service providers (see list) and/or immersion experiences (seasonal).

Seniors—78 Hours (Senior Service Project): Students may serve their hours at any location of their choosing selecting from any one of our 80-85 pre-selected SSP Partnering Agencies (see list of providers and Senior Service Project Handbook).

Are service hours required to be completed by a certain due date?
– Freshmen are expected to complete their 2 tutoring sessions by December 7, 2019.

– Completion of Sophomore, Junior service hours and a reflection component are a requirement for graduation. Service hours that students earn towards fulfilling their grade level service requirements must be completed by June 1, 2020 to assure that a passing grade. It is highly recommended that the first 10 hours be completed during the first semester.

– Senior students are to complete all Senior Project hours during the period of January 6-24, 2020.

– Passing grade is recorded as CR. Until all requirements are completed at each grade level, which include service hours and reflection, the student grade will be recorded as IP or INC.

– Any service hours that students earn over the summer will be credited the following academic year.

What is the first step in beginning the process of fulfilling the service requirements?
Freshmen: Students will receive an in-service in their Theology classes in September. Students will select and sign-up for their two-tutoring session on their MobileServe app.

Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors: Students must consult Dr. Rodriguez or Mrs. Moran in person. Below are the next steps:

– Once approved by a member of the Community Service Team, the student must contact the site / volunteer supervisor at the selected organization, inquire about volunteer openings and make an appointment to meet with the supervisor.
– Students and their parents must complete the registration form. This form will be sent to you via DocuSign after consulting with a member of the Community Service Team.

How do students submit their service hours?
MobileServe is used as the management system to record hours fulfilled for Loyola High School and beyond and reservations for certain service activities. Information on how to create a MobileServe student account and log hours in is available to students via their Canvas Community Service Course page.

What if students participate in an Immersion Experience like Intercambio, Urban Plunge, Kino?
Students in grades 10-11 may engage in a variety of immersion programs that go beyond the expected service hour requirements. Therefore, students wishing to engage in any of these or other immersion programs that exceed the hours will meet with one of the leadership team members to review the ways their participation will meet the guidelines set out by the program.

Service and Justice Immersion Experiences 2019-2020
NOTE: This does not represent our current list for 2020; new programs are in development.


Los Angeles Weekend Urban Plunge (Each Academic Quarter)
This service and justice immersion program is designed to introduce students to the realities of homelessness in Los Angeles, specifically, the area in Downtown Los Angeles known as Skid Row. Participants will perform various service duties such as preparing meals, sharing meals and engaging in conversations with many of the homeless at one of the selected service sites (identified below).
• www.stfranciscenterla.org/
• www.goodshepherdshelter.org/
• www.latimes.com/opinion/editorials/la-ed-homeless-crisis-overview-20180225-htmlstory.html

Ignatian Family Teach in for Justice – Washington, DC (November)
Sponsored by the Ignatian Family Network, the annual program serves as a teach in on current and historical social justice issues as well as a forum to develop attitudes and skills for advocating on behalf of more just political, social and legislative action. It is the largest social justice program of its kind focused on youth enrolled in Jesuit educational institutions across the US, Canada with 2,200 delegates from nearly all 100 Jesuit high school and universities represented. Nationally and internationally known speakers; high school/college presenters. Advocacy meetings with members of Congress from California on current issues.
• ignatiansolidarity.net/iftj/

Kino Border Immersion (Thanksgiving Vacation)
This service and justice immersion program is designed to introduce students to the complexities of immigration and life along the US/Mexico Border. In collaboration with the Kino Border Initiative, students will provide humanitarian support to recently deported migrants in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico while listening to the stories of migrants and attempting to critically understand our immigration system, the deportation process and the ways we can serve as advocates for humane immigrant reform. Students reside in the Jesuit guest house on the Arizona side of the border.

Baja House Builds – Weekends (December Vacation/Easter Vacation)
This service and justice immersion program is sponsored by the Loyola Father’s Club in collaboration with Baja Christian Ministries. This program is designed to build homes in the region of Tecate, Mexico for designated families.
• theloyalist.org/allarticles/news/cubs-to-build-two-houses-in-baja-mexico/

11th Annual Intercambio – Student Exchange Program—Argentina-Uruguay (Summer-June to July)
This is a six-week immersion / student exchange program with our Jesuit secondary schools in Buenos Aires, Argentina as well as Tacuarembo and Montevideo, Uruguay. Students participating in this summer program will be required to host a student from one of the partnering colegios during February / March). In exchange, the student will host a Cub when he travels in the summer. Students need to be Spanish competent either as native speakers or via Spanish classes.
• theloyalist.org/allarticles/feature/intercambio/

Ecuador Summer Immersion – Quito (June)
This eight to nine-day summer service and culture immersion offered in conjunction with the Jesuits’ Working Boys Center designed to provide tutorial assistance, home building and repair projects with the WBC families. Spanish fluency helpful, but not required.

Los Angeles Summer Urban Plunge – Five days (June and July)
Much like the weekend plunge, this service and justice immersion program is a week-long experience designed to introduce students to the realities of homelessness in Los Angeles, specifically, the area in Downtown Los Angeles known as Skid Row. Participants will perform various service duties such as preparing meals, sharing meals and engaging in conversations with many of the homeless at one of the selected service sites.

Los Angeles Urban Plunge:
This service and justice immersion program is designed to introduce students to the realities of homelessness in Los Angeles, specifically, the area in Downtown LA known as Skid Row.
– Urban Plunge L.A. #1: October 18-20, 2019
– Application information and sign-up link will be posted on Monday, September 23

Winter 2019 Day of Service – Saturday, December 14:
This is an annual communal event that brings together the Loyola High School community (alumni, parents, students, families, faculty and staff), together for a single purpose; to work shoulder to shoulder in improving the lives of others. The day of service consists of a variety of volunteer tasks including: sorting, packing and distributing food to those in need, general maintenance, and gardening.
– Application and sign-up link will go live on Monday, October 28

Winter Baja Build Immersion:
Twelve father/son teams will form a Cub construction crew to build a home for a family living in impoverished conditions in the Colonia de San Bernardo area of Eastern Tijuana.
– Winter Build #1: December | Winter Build #2: December
– Application information and sign-up link is now available! Please
click here to sign up.

Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice (IFTJ) – Washington, DC:
This is an annual gathering for members of the Ignatian family (Jesuit institutions and larger church) to come together in the context of social justice and solidarity to learn, reflect, pray, network, and advocate together. It is a place where people are empowered, re-energized, inspired, challenged, and supported by a community that sees faith and justice integrally linked. Now in its 20th year, the IFTJ has a rich history rooted in honoring the Jesuits and their companions who were martyred in El Salvador in 1989.
– November 15-19, 2019
– Application information and sign-up link will be posted on Monday, September 23, 2019

When do the Immersion Programs take place?
Usually, immersion experiences take place during vacation periods and weekends throughout the school year.

Where do the Immersion Programs take place?
Currently, they include the following programs:

International – one to five weeks in duration
• Argentina and Uruguay for Intercambio/Exchange: 4 weeks
• Quito, Ecuador: 7 days
• El Paso, Mexico—The Encuentro Project: 4 – 5 days
• Baja Build – weekend projects

Domestic Immersion Programs – weekend and weeklong programs
• Border Immersion Program: Kino Border Initiative—U.S. / Mexico Border (Nogales, Sonora, Mexico / Nogales, Arizona, US)
• Los Angeles, California – weeklong program
• Los Angeles, California – weekend program
• Detroit, Michigan – weeklong program
• Washington, DC – five-day program
• Other Programs are in development (for the 2020 Summer Season)

Who is permitted to participate in the Immersion Programs?
Sophomores and Juniors. International trips will be open only for juniors (rising seniors); domestic trips are open for both sophomores and juniors.

What will students do while on Immersion?
Our service immersion program offers sophomores and juniors an opportunity to put their faith into action in a very challenging and real way. The service experiences are about responding to the Gospel call to serve those in need, while questioning the reasons behind why people are in need. While each immersion has its own unique slant, they all encourage participants to learn about living in solidarity with people and experiencing a different way of living, often without many material possessions.

Students may be building homes, cleaning, tutoring, environmental restoration and preservation, providing humanitarian aid, cleaning, learning about laws/policies that impact marginalized groups, learning advocacy methods.

Will students receive course credit for participating in an Immersion Program?
Yes. Only service hour credit, and only for sophomore and junior service. Not for the Senior Service Project.

What does it cost to participate in an Immersion Program?
All prices will vary given on distance and time-away. Immersions may cost anywhere between $100 and $5,500, depending on the length of the immersion. This information will be listed on the application.

Is financial aid available for students who currently qualify for tuition assistance and are in good standing with the school?
Yes, partial financial aid is available for students who currently qualify for tuition assistance and are in good standing with the school. An application for financial assistance will be submitted to the Director, Center for Service and Justice and will be reviewed by the leadership team of the center before making any recommendations to the leadership of the school. Financial assistance will only be provided once during the student’s time at Loyola in an effort to provide access to our immersions for other students.

Is there an application to participate in an Immersion Program?
Yes. A Pre-Registration Form is the first step. This determines the program the candidate is interested in and the commitment level. Once this has been reviewed, a formal application is submitted to the Immersion Coordinator for that specific immersion program.

Are payment plans allowed?
Yes. Payment plans are welcome and payment may be accepted using cash, credit card or check. Payments must be submitted to our Accounting Office Attention Ms. Angelica Young. All payments must include the name of the Immersion (location) and student name and ID.

Are refunds given should travel plans change?
Yes. Refunds will be granted using a refund schedule to determine the amount of refund granted.
• Six Months Before Immersion: 100% Refund for Travel
• Four Months Before Immersion: Three-Quarter Refund for Travel
• Two Months Before Immersion: 50% Refund for Travel
• One Month Before Travel: No Refund for Travel

Where do students stay while on an Immersion experience?
Students stay in a variety of settings depending on the immersion experience. This may range from dormitories on a school campus, a separate dorm setting in a homeless shelter, a hotel, with a host family, in a gym, or in residential housing (parish/church/center).

Should students bring spending money?
We recommend that students bring an internationally enabled debit card (Visa or Mastercard) that they can use at ATMs to withdraw local currency if on an international immersion. Note that most banks are able to issue a separate card with a finite balance so that your bank account isn’t compromised if the card is lost or stolen during travel.

What forms of ID are required?
All students must possess a valid US Passport to travel abroad and a California ID that allows for domestic flights.

Will the school provide travel insurance?
No. The school will not provide travel insurance, but parents/guardians may choose to purchase this and add the amount to the overall program cost.

What are the school’s expectations in terms of behavior/code of conduct?
This is a school-sponsored activity. Therefore, the code of conduct stipulated in our Parent-Student Handbook applies. Dress code and grooming will, however, differ due to the type of work students will be engaged in.

Will I be able to speak with my son during the immersion experience?
Yes, but use of cell phones are severely restricted during most of the immersion experience as a way to allow the students to “immerse” themselves without distractions. However, time is set aside to speak with friends and family. Please know that charges for long-distance calls (international calling) will be paid for by the student.

When does the process begin and how do I apply?
The process begins in October with the Immersion Information Meeting/Expo. We will offer two informational meetings to best accommodate family schedules in December.

When do the immersions take place?
Service immersion are scheduled for April/Easter vacation, June/July – before Summer School and after Summer School, over 4th of July Holiday extended weekend, during December/Christmas vacation and at other strategic dates so as to minimize loss of class time for students. Please check your calendar for date conflicts in advance (SAT, Summer School, family trips). Even though we start the process in October, it is possible that the dates for a few of the immersions may not be secured until early December.

Does participating in an immersion fulfill my service requirements?
Yes! Sophomore and junior requirements. Not for the Senior Service Project.

How many students are selected for the service immersion teams?
Immersions groups are composed of 8-10 students, depending on the Immersion trip.

Who are the chaperones?
Each immersion has two Loyola faculty or staff members who act as the immersion leaders and chaperones.

What are you looking for in immersion participants?
The ideal participant is someone who is compassionate, empathetic, open to growth, hard-working, flexible, spiritual (it is not a requirement that you are Catholic!), reflective and able to reflect with his peers, concerned about social justice, and passionate about instigating change in our world, while learning about and serving a specific population of people. Immersions require a lot of work and energy before, during and after, and they are not for everyone! That being said, they are life-altering experiences for most participants. Students come back feeling enriched, renewed, and challenged to continue with the work they did.

All students are required to log in their service hours promptly upon completion of each day’s service. These are the steps to ensure that student service hours will be counted towards their graduation requirements:

• Meet with a Community Service Team Member to discuss their proposed project
• Contact the proposed service site to confirm volunteer opportunities are available and proceed to sign-up with the site
• Complete and submit the online Loyola registration form
– Freshmen: sign-up using MobileServe
– Sophomores and Juniors: registration via Docusign online form
– Seniors: will register their project with a paper form
• Begin actively volunteering
• Log in completed hours student MobileServe account
• All logged hours must be verified and approved before they are counted towards credit

Welcome to Loyola High School!

As a Loyola Cub, students will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of educational and extracurricular activities. Community service is co-curricular activity that will be interwoven into each year and is guided by the words of St. Ignatius of Loyola, “Love ought to show itself more in deeds than in words.” During each year at Loyola, students will be required to participate in a community service project. It is our goal that through these projects each student will gain awareness, make a connection to the community, and discover how he can work towards making a positive impact in the world.

The Freshman Community Service Project centers on the HSPT-8 Tutoring Outreach Program. There are six-Saturday morning sessions that make-up this program. All members of the freshman class are required to take part in this program by volunteering for a minimum of two tutoring sessions. While two sessions are required, we do encourage volunteering for additional sessions. Freshmen should refer to their Community Service page on Canvas for direction on how to select and sign-up for their two tutoring sessions.

The HSPT-8 Program is offered free of charge to over six-hundred, eighth grade students from under-resourced, inner city schools and is made possible due to the generosity of the Loyola High School Community. The program provides tutoring in Mathematics, English and test prep skills. Freshmen will serve as tutors: helping to guide and mentor students.

Teamwork is a key factor to the success of this program; Loyola students, parents/guardians, faculty, staff and alumni volunteers working towards a common goal of enriching the educational opportunities of the participating eighth grade participants. The HSPT-8 Program could not take place without adult volunteers. Loyola students are the primary tutors in the classroom, however in order for this program to be successful, adult volunteers are needed to manage the classrooms that are in use during each tutoring session. We encourage parents/guardians to sign-up and support this program by volunteering to help out as a classroom supervisor! The online sign-up form may be accessed by copying the following link:

https://loyolahs.formstack.com/forms/hspt_2019parentguardianvolunteers

All adult volunteers must be up-to-date with VIRTUS training. The Archdiocese of Los Angeles mandates this training for all adults working with children. This education component helps prevent child sexual abuse by first making every adult employee and volunteer aware of the issues surrounding child sexual abuse. (Archdiocese of Los Angeles). Loyola High School offers an on campus VIRTUS training session.

A new programmatic approach to fulfilling community service hours was made available to sophomore students beginning August 31, 2018.

This new approach will help emphasize the philosophy of Magis, doing more for Christ, and, therefore, doing more for others. As a result, the goals are fourfold:
• To provide opportunities for “metanoia”—a radical transformation of the hearts and minds of our young men;
• To provide an articulated sequence of service and reflection opportunities that lead them to experience a sense of solidarity with the poor and marginalized so that such opportunities for transformation can take place;
• To encourage students to move away from viewing service as a requirement; merely doing the work to complete the number of hours required; and
• To provide students with viable opportunities to “grow deeper” through their service experience, helping develop a positive approach towards future service endeavors.

We will offer eight distinct service and justice clusters for each student to select from; completing any one of these clusters will fulfill the hours needed to meet the service and justice criteria. Each of the eight clusters is unique, focusing on serving a specific population or area of need, and are in keeping with the goals of a Jesuit Education. Therefore, students are called on a mission to put Two Feet of Love in Action! This foundational tool describes two distinct, but complementary, ways we can put the Gospel in action in response to God’s love: social justice (addressing systemic, root causes of problems that affect many people) and charitable works (short-term, emergency assistance for individuals). For this reason, we believe that service must involve direct assistance to those programs and/or people that are in need. In some way, service must be addressing a root cause of problems that affect the most vulnerable.

In addition to the completion of their selected cluster, each sophomore will attend and participate in reflection meetings/sessions. These meetings will be held on the Loyola campus during school hours. Further information and details about reflections will be posted at a later time.

Sophomore Service and Justice Clusters:

CLUSTER #1: TUTORING & MENTORING YOUTH
This cluster is fulfilled by working with youth that are from an under-served and/or under-resourced community. Tutoring at a school, after-school program, participation in the Loyola HSPT-8 Tutoring Outreach Program, mentoring youth sports programs are examples of types of service activities that apply to this cluster. A minimum of 19 hours must be completed.

CLUSTER #2: FOOD INSECURITY
This cluster will require students to work with an organization whose mission is to fight hunger in the community, and work to bring about awareness and education that address this issue. Fulfilling this cluster should be accomplished by working with a food bank/pantry and a service organization where direct service is incorporated. A list of potential sites found on Canvas (this list will be posted at a later time). A minimum of 15 hours (a minimum of 8 hours must involve direct service).

CLUSTER #3: ORGANIZED TEAM SERVICE ACTIVITIES
Clubs, athletic teams may choose to participate in an organized service activity. This is a great way to incorporate team work and also work towards our mission in service. Prior approval must be given by the LHS Community Service Team prior to beginning this cluster. Minimum of 15-20 hours, dependent upon by the team and Community Service Team.

CLUSTER #4: SUPPORTING THOSE WITH INTELLECTUAL OR PHYSICAL DISABILITIES
This cluster focuses on organizations that work with persons that are intellectually or physically disabled. Student volunteers will accompany this community through support, education and encouragement. The Special Olympics, ARC, Challenger Baseball Little League, AYSO VIP Buddy Program are examples of organizations that that fit this cluster. Minimum of 16 hours.

CLUSTER #5: ELDER CARE
Working with seniors, whether at a convalescent/nursing facility, or retirement/assisted care center. Student volunteers would engage in activities such as games, movie watching, reading, etc. Minimum of 16 hours.

CLUSTER #6: IMMERSION TRIPS (depending upon the immersion, some trips may fulfill both sophomore and junior service hours)
Summer service immersion trips that are coordinated by the LHS Community Service Department may be applied to this cluster. In addition, some outside service immersion trips that are coordinated by outside organizations may qualify, prior approval from the LHS Community Service Team is required. Minimum of 20 hours (hours will vary as per the length and intensity of experience.

CLUSTER #7: IGNATIAN FAMILY TEACH-IN PAIRED WITH IMMIGRATION CENTERS/MIGRANT SUPPORT SERVICES
See Dr. Rodriguez in the Community Service Center for details.

CLUSTER #8: TRADITIONAL 20 HOURS SERVICE MODEL
Those students seeking to fulfill their service and justice requirement with a organization/agency that does not fit in Cluster 1-7, may propose a service project listed on our pre-qualified service sites list or speak to a Community Service Team Member to introduce a new site (see Community Service Team for the pre-qualified service sites). Minimum of 20 hours.
Juniors are required to complete a minimum of 25 service hours by Monday, June 1, 2020. The first 10 hours of the required 25 should be completed by the end of their first semester. Prior to beginning any service, students must follow the steps listed under Module titled Registration Steps only after receiving approval from a member of the Community Service Team.

In addition to the completion of their service hours, each junior will be required to participate in a reflection series/meetings. Further details and information regarding reflections will soon be available.

The Community Service Team is always available to help guide students towards creating and maintaining a meaningful and successful service project. The best time to meet with a team member is before school, during junior advising period, recess, lunch or after school. Students may also contact the team by phone or at communityservice@loyolahs.edu

Student Code of Conduct: Loyola High School strives to maintain an environment where students may develop their minds, bodies, and souls to meet the goals of the Graduate-at-Graduation. As members of the Loyola community, students should demonstrate respect and concern for themselves and others. Loyola’s Norms of Student Conduct establish both general and specific guidelines for the expectations of student behavior. The intent of enforcing these directives is to provide fair and consistent consequences that will facilitate personal growth and responsibility as Loyola students become Men for Others.

As a student engaged in the Service and Justice programs and projects at Loyola High School, I will commit to the following:

1. Conduct myself in accordance to the Norms of Student Conduct;

2. Place the needs of the community I am serving FIRST;

3. Wear LHS attire for all service commitments (this includes service shirts, club shirts or any LHS logo specific attire;

4. Register my Junior Service and Justice Project.

5. Attend and participate in two Loyola High School Community Service Reflection Meetings. (NOTE: Meetings will take place on the Loyola campus during school hours.)

6. Complete and submit a reflection exercise and a self-evaluation form
• A reflection exercise and self-evaluation form will be assigned to you during your first reflection meeting.
• You will be required to turn in your completed reflection exercise and self-evaluation form during your second meeting.

7. Complete the minimum of 25 hours at your selected and pre-approved service site, and full participation in a reflection component.

The Senior Service Project (SSP) is the capstone of Loyola’s Service Program. As a senior, you will be dedicating three weeks in January to working with an underserved, marginalized or in need community. Actions we can perform that extend God’s compassion and mercy to those in need should be at the heart of your service.

The value of your Senior Service Project experience is important to the entire Loyola community. It is a time when all things are on hold for the senior so that he might fully engage in the work of service and reflection. It is a time for each young man to open his heart, hands and head to the work of Christ in their midst. The community is here to support them and create a meaningful Senior Service Project.

The following is a general guide to inform the overall process (the SSP Handbook will be available on Canvas):

1. Before registering for a project, seniors must have fulfilled their sophomore and junior community service requirements or have a plan to complete the graduation requirement before December 1.

2. All seniors will complete a minimum of 78 service hours at a pre-qualified and approved SSP partnering service providers.

3. Seniors will not be allowed to serve at a site they have previously volunteered at. Seniors will be asked to serve a new area or community for their SSP. If they volunteered at a site near their home during sophomore and junior year, they will be asked to sign-up for a SSP that is located outside of their neighborhood.

4. The number of seniors allowed at each site is restricted; this number is set by the Center for Service and Justice.

5. Seniors must meet with a member of the SSP Team to obtain pre-approval of an intended SSP site.

6. Pre-approval of a SSP site does not guarantee placement at the site.
– It is vital that students work efficiently to complete the registration process in order to secure a volunteer space at their proposed site.

7. Senior college and recruiting visits are NOT ALLOWED during the term of SSP.

8. Students are expected to serve at their registered SSP site during the term of a regular school day (typically, 8:00 a.m. through 2:30 p.m.) beginning Monday, after Christmas vacation through the fourth Friday of January) the exception of Monday morning, after Christmas vacation. On this day, seniors will report to their SSP site following the conclusion of their reflection meeting and commissioning (schedule to be shared).

9. Service hours missed due to illness must be made up by the Friday of semester break (February 1).

All information pertaining to the Senior Service Project may be found on their Senior Service Canvas Cours page.