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Fine & Performing Arts

Fine and Performing Arts Graduation Requirements

(2 semesters)

Students are required to complete two semesters of Fine Arts. The University of California and the California State University systems require a full year of fine arts. UC and CSU also require a student to complete both Parts I and II in the same fine and performing arts discipline. Although highly encouraged, Part I and II do not have to be completed in the same academic year at Loyola.

Special Notes

  1. All Fine and Performing Arts classes meet the Loyola H.S. graduation requirement.
  2. All Fine and Performing Arts classes meet the University of California system’s art requirement. This is a two semester requirement.
  3. All Fine and Performing Arts classes meet the California State system’s art requirement. This is a two semester requirement.
  4. All Fine and Performing Arts classes are figured into the student’s GPA/class standing.
  5. There is a lab fee charge made for each Fine Arts course taken.

Faculty

Fine and Performing Arts

 

Fine Arts Course Options

 

Black & White Film Photography (Mr. David Roberts): This course introduces students to the foundational principles of photography through the use of 35mm, black and white film. Through project-based learning, students will cultivate proficiency in the use of 35mm camera operation (aperture and shutter speed settings, light metering, lens focal length) in connection with the principles of photographic composition, framing, and the ability to read various light sources. Students will use darkroom equipment to develop their own film and make photographic prints from their negatives. The course emphasizes both technical and aesthetic fundamentals, while also understanding the historical, cultural, and social influences of photography throughout the world. Upon completion of the course, students will have a fluent understanding of camera operations, traditional darkroom developing techniques, and how to utilize composition in order to create an aesthetically pleasing, and thought-provoking photographic image.

 

Ceramics (Ms. Patricia Meyers): This course is a studio-based introduction to ceramic art and processes. Historical and contemporary examples, aesthetics, and three-dimensional design principles will be highlighted through demonstrations, lectures, and tutorials. Students will learn a variety of hand building techniques, wheel thrown techniques, and casting techniques. Students will learn to finish their work through numerous decorative techniques using underglazes, engobes, high fire glazes, and low fire glazes. Class projects will place an emphasis on practical technique while also allowing each student to develop their personal aesthetic within the realm of ceramics.

The course will cover numerous fundamental aspects of ceramic production. It will cover hand building (pinch, coil, soft slab, hard slab, press, and mold), wheel throwing (centering, pulling, shaping, attachments, cylinder, and bowl forms), and slip casting (one-part plaster mold building, two part plaster mold building, and reproductive casting). This course will also cover numerous finishing glaze methods (engobes, underglaze, wax resist, latex resist, sgraffito, pouncing, stenciling, low fire, and high fire).

Students will also look at Art History and work to understand the place and function of ceramics within the conversation of Contemporary Art.

 

Design (Ms. Jocelyn Grau): This class is an introduction to the fundamental principles of two-dimensional design. Students will achieve an understanding of line, form, texture, pattern, space, value, and color. Students will be introduced to the unifying principles of design and how to utilize them to create a compelling, easily understandable, and memorable image.

Problems dealing with spatial organization, measurement, and composition are emphasized in numerous two-dimensional projects.  Students will develop basic design skills through hands-on, tactile, project-based artworks that explore positive and negative space, scale and form, patterns, color, and image reproduction.  Assignments explore the manipulation of numerous two-dimensional media, printmaking techniques, manual image reproduction, and proper usage of manual design tools.

Students will also look at Art History and work to unravel the role of Design within the conversation of Contemporary Art and contemporary society.

 

Digital Photography (Father John Quinn, SJ)This is an introductory studio course in Digital Photography. In this course students will learn the fundamentals of photographic composition, camera operation, and digital photographic editing. The primary focus of this course is to teach the student to effectively use a digital camera and utilize computer software to make the most out of his photographs. Students will gain an understanding of the history of photography and begin to explore the expressive qualities of the photographic medium.

Digital Photography is a hands-on, project-based course. Students will learn the tools and techniques for creating compelling photographs. This course provides an understanding of the technical aspects of photography involving the operation of their DSLR camera, proper compositional skills, and photographic editing on computers. Students will be introduced to aesthetic principles of image making and will work to achieve technical and aesthetic excellence in all of their produced work. Individual creativity, visual problem solving, and precise craftsmanship will be stressed.

Students will also look at the role of Photography in Art History and work to unravel its role within the world of Contemporary Art.

 

Drawing (Mr. Patricia Meyers, Mrs. Cristina Saggese)This class is an introduction to classical and contemporary drawing techniques. Students will develop an understanding and knowledge of line, shape, perspective, proportion, volume, and composition. Students will develop a full range of drawing skills, expand their vocabulary of mark making, make accurate perceptual drawings, and use those skills to hone their ability to self-express.

Drawing is a basic studio course in the media and techniques of drawing. In class activity will emphasize the study and mastery of two-dimensional representation, multiple different drawing media, and teach students how to make informed choices in their methods of representation in order to accurately communicate with others through visual image making. Projects will consider the development of concept, compositional decisions, craftsmanship, experimentation, and expression.

Students will also look at Art History and work to unravel the role of Drawing within the conversation of Contemporary Art.

 

Painting (Ms. Jocelyn Grau): This class is an introduction to the fundamental principles of painting. Students will achieve an understanding of composition, mass, form, texture, space, value, and color. Students will also be introduced to the basic unifying principles of image making and how to utilize them to create compelling and memorable works.

Painting is a basic studio course in the media and techniques of painting. Activity will emphasize the study of color, structure, creativity, and aesthetic values in general. A command of techniques and materials, both traditional and experimental, will be taught. Projects range from Representation to Abstraction and follow the historical lineage of painting as a guide to learning different forms and styles. Students will work exclusively in Gouache and Acrylic paint for the duration of the class.

Students will also look at Art History and work to unravel the role of Painting within the conversation of Contemporary Art.

 

AP 2-D Art & Design (three course cap / 60 student cap) – (Mrs. Cristina Saggese)The AP 2-D course is designed to instruct students in multiple ways of creating works of art with multiple two-dimensional media. Students will develop knowledge through research-based assignments and assignments designed to help each student develop a personal voice. The development of creativity, skill, personal expression, and problem solving, and self-motivation will be emphasized. Craftsmanship, design and skill will be addressed with each assignment. Assignments will be assessed through critique.

Students taking AP 2-D must have taken a full year of visual art classes and have a recommendation from their previous instructor. They must also apply to the class by submitting work to the current instructor. Additionally, students must exhibit the ability to work independently, create work that reflects skill, and show that they are capable of taking creative initiative with assignments.

Students accepted and enrolled in the class will meet with the instructor to discuss requirements and receive summer assignments at the end of the year before entering AP 2-D. Students in AP 2-D must be committed to doing considerably more work than the average art class. The class will have the rigor of a college level course. By the end of the year each student will have completed 15 works that are representative of sustained intense investigation and a shared theme as well as 5 selected works that represent the breadth of their skill in numerous two dimensional media. These works will be submitted to the College Board for assessment.

 

AP 3-D Art & Design (one course cap / 20 student cap) – (Ms. Jocelyn Grau): The AP 3-D course is designed to instruct students in multiple ways of creating functional and sculptural works of art. Students will develop knowledge through research-based assignments and assignments designed to help each student develop a personal voice. The development of creativity, skill, personal expression, and problem solving, and self-motivation will be emphasized. Craftsmanship, design and skill will be addressed with each assignment. Assignments will be assessed through critique.

Students taking AP 3-D must have taken a full year of visual art classes and have a recommendation from their previous instructor. They must also apply to the class by submitting sculptural work to the current instructor. Additionally, students must exhibit the ability to work independently, create work that reflects skill, and show that they are capable of taking creative initiative with assignments.

Students accepted and enrolled in the class will meet with the instructor to discuss requirements and receive summer assignments at the end of the year before entering AP 3-D. Students in AP 3-D must be committed to doing considerably more work than the average art class. The class will have the rigor of a college level course. By the end of the year each student will have completed 15 works that are representative of sustained intense investigation and a shared theme as well as 5 selected works that represent the breadth of their skill in Sculptural media. These works will be submitted to the College Board for assessment.

 

AP Drawing (one course cap / 20 student cap) – (Ms. Jocelyn Grau): The AP Drawing course is designed to instruct students in multiple ways of creating drawn and painted works of art. Students will develop knowledge through research-based assignments and assignments designed to help each student develop a personal voice. The development of creativity, skill, personal expression, and problem solving, and self-motivation will be emphasized. Craftsmanship, design, and skill will be addressed with each assignment. Assignments will be assessed through critique.

Students taking AP Drawing must have taken a full year of visual art classes and have a recommendation from their previous instructor. They must also apply to the class by submitting drawn or painted work to the current instructor. Additionally, students must exhibit the ability to work independently, create work that reflects skill, and show that they are capable of taking creative initiative with assignments.

Students accepted and enrolled in the class will meet with the instructor to discuss requirements and receive summer assignments at the end of the year before entering AP Drawing. Students in AP Drawing must be committed to doing considerably more work than the average art class. The class will have the rigor of a college level course. By the end of the year each student will have completed 15 works that are representative of sustained intense investigation and a shared theme as well as 5 selected works that represent the breadth of their skill in Drawing media. These works will be submitted to the College Board for assessment.

Performing Arts Course Options

 

Acting Workshop (Mr. Walter Wolfe): This course strengthens a student’s creativity skills in becoming a successful storyteller.  Project-based learning methods explore each student’s unique way of thinking and communicating as he investigates the synthesis of basic theatrical concepts into a cohesive whole.  Important learning objectives include the analysis and application of physical communication styles, dramatic structure principles, and oral interpretation techniques. On a daily basis, students will rehearse and perform projects exploring creative visualization and communication feedback while collaborating with their classmates in an expressive learning environment.

This course is designed for the kinesthetic learner with a need to enhance his English skills, develop self-confidence, and boost self-esteem through fun, challenging, and non-traditional classroom activity. The first semester explores the fundamentals of becoming a confident and informed performer. The second semester synthesizes these basics by analyzing the actor’s understanding of performing styles and his connection to the history of theatrical art. By the end of the second semester, students will have performed in a variety of theatrical styles including improvisation, Shakespeare, and stage combat. If a student is interested in taking a leadership role on campus, this course provides the confidence and the tools to be a commanding presence on stage.

Band (Mr. Michael Celenza): This course emphasizes the art of musical ensemble performance. Students will learn to play an instrument in one of three band sections: brass, woodwinds or percussion. Many genres of concert band music will be explored. Attention to both historical and contemporary dynamics such as pitch, rhythm, and intonation will frame a student’s skill-building and ensemble technique.   Students also perform as soloists and will develop their individual artistry through an emphasis on accuracy, expression, and articulation through the study of music theory and ear training.  The first semester explores the fundamentals of reading music such as clef, key signature, time signature, and three-voice harmony. The second semester explores more complex chord structures, transposing, and composition. In both semesters, students will learn to listen more effectively, make historical connections, and evaluate instrumentation, period, and style.

Music 1 & 2 (Mr. Steven Speciale): An introduction to the fundamentals of music performance and theory through choral practice.  Students will be introduced to the elements of music theory and fundamental musicianship skills that lay the foundation for Advanced Placement Music Theory and beyond. Skills learned and topics covered include sight-reading, pitch matching, rhythm, basic notation, music styles from ancient to contemporary, and world languages as they relate to music performance. Open to all students. No experience is necessary. If you have ever sung in a choir or play piano this course is recommended for you. The theory in Music will adequately prepare students for AP Music Theory. An increasingly broad and sophisticated range of music repertoire is performed.

Piano (Mr. Michael Celenza): This course explores the art of solo piano performance. Students will be immersed in discovering and playing music from many genres. A student’s individual performance will be assessed based on their understanding and application of specific criteria such as tempo, accuracy, expression, and technique. Essential to this exploration will be music theory and ear training.  The first semester explores the fundamentals of music such as clef, key signature, time signature, and three-voice harmony. With an emphasis on developing compositional skills, the second semester explores more complex chord structures, harmony, and modulations. In both semesters, students will research important figures throughout the history of keyboarding, and will make presentations to demonstrate a synthesis of their learning.

Music Appreciation (Mr. Steven Speciale): This course explores the history, development, and compositional elements of experimental music and sound art. Through innovative project-based learning, students are exposed to a variety of musical and visual artistic practices. This class is for the curious student with wide-ranging interests in music, art, and media in general. Class projects from this course have exhibited at curated sound art festivals for the last ten years. Students can expect to practice skills with sound-editing technology, movie-making, forms of photography, music making, installation art, and performance of all kinds.

AP Music Theory (one course cap / 15 student cap) – (Mr. Steven Speciale): This course introduces the student to the basic skills involved in both listening to and writing music. The fundamentals of the reading and writing of music to be studied include: Elementary Theory: notation, clefs, key signatures, major and minor scales, intervals; Harmony: simple triads, choral progressions, melodies; Ear-Training: intervals, melodies, triads, melodies, some chord patterns; Composition: melodic structures and simple chord progressions. The basic performance instruments used throughout the course are voice, computer, and keyboard. Musical examples from the works of the major composers will be studied. In part, the examples will be used to exemplify those music fundamentals being studied. The examples will also be analyzed, using the same fundamentals to reach a more complete understanding of musical structure and meaning. Discussion and reflection upon various approaches to aesthetics will allow the student to discover possible approaches to a philosophy of music (and of the arts, in general) and to consider the possibilities of musical meaning. Instructor’s permission is required for enrollment.

 

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